Kinhin

Something we do on a regular basis at the Zendo is to stand up after every 30 minutes of meditation to walk and stretch our legs. This is not like taking a break after working. This is a continuation of our meditation practice. This is walking meditation. In Japan this walking is called Kinhin.

We maintain our focus and turn our attention to our feet and our breath.

Kinhin is a true embodiment of our practice. It is the manifestation of the one-body. A chance to set aside our independence, set aside our ego, our “self”.
We become the Kinhin line. We become one-body.

During Kinhin we each play a role. There is the head, the tail, and the body.
Each role has a function.
The head cannot be the tail. The tail cannot be the head. The body cannot be disjointed.
Maintain the line.
Maintain the one-body.

If you are the head then you must maintain awareness and take into account both the faster and slower members of the “body”. Your pace should accommodate both. Always look to maintain the line. Maintain the one-body.

If you are the tail you must maintain awareness and not fall behind. Maintain the line. Maintain the one-body.

If you are the body you must maintain awareness and not become disjointed from the group. Maintain the line. Maintain the one-body.

No separation.

No gaps.

People leaving the Kinhin line will do so with a brief bow.

People rejoining the line will wait and enter at the tail of the line. They will then assume a new role.
The roles in the line can change many times within one walking period.
This is not unlike our very lives where we are constantly changing our roles and positions.
Maintain the one-body.
One Body.
Kozan.

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